View from 70 Pine Street

View from 70 Pine Street

70 Pine Street

Building:  

A landmarked building built in 1932 soaring 952 feet, 70 Pine was the third tallest building in the world upon completion. Commissioned by Citi Services Company and later the headquarters of AIG, its art deco design was a statement of dynamism, financial strength, and optimism.  The 67-story building was designed by the firms of Clinton & Russell and Holton & George.  The limestone-clad tower features an open air platform with an enclosed glass observatory above its 66th floor, offering a higher view of downtown Manhattan than from any other building.

In 2013, began the conversion of the landmark building into a multi-purpose destination. Once completed, the unique historic character of the building will be incorporated into 776 luxury apartments, Q&A extended-stay hotel, La Palestra fitness and wellness center, restaurant at the top of the building having a breath taking 360 degree view, and 35,000 square feet of retail space. 


Landmarked Art Deco Lobby at 20 Exchange Place

Landmarked Art Deco Lobby at 20 Exchange Place

20 Exchange Place

Building:

Designed by the esteemed architectural firm of Cross & Cross in the restrained style once known as “Modern Classic,” the 57-story skyscraper was completed in 1931. It was built to be the Wall Street headquarters of the City Bank Farmers Trust Company, which would become one of the world’s largest banking institutions – CitiBank. This stone-clad icon is among New York’s tallest buildings and is one of the most prominent features of the lower Manhattan skyline. The steel-framed tower is sheathed in Granite and Limestone, making it, at the time of completion, the World’s tallest building with a stone-faced façade and one of the era’s most noteworthy skyscrapers. Reaching 741 feet high, the “wedding cake” style skyscraper was also the fourth tallest building in New York City remaining in the top ten tallest until the 1970’s. 

Giant piers rise to freestanding heroic figures said to represent the giants of finance. The main entrance is distinguished by a dramatic round arch and is surrounded by 11 coins of carved granite that represented the many countries in which the institution had offices. Decorative doors of Nickel Silver, with Bronze trim and a variety of cast and carved forms, designed by the British sculptor David Evans, adorn the lower floors.  Its glorious banking halls and superb Art Deco details remain intact. Twenty Exchange is one of New York’s most important landmarks.

The conversion of 20 Exchange to residential was completed in 3 phases with the final phase completed in 2015.  The 56-story building is comprised of 767 units, a newly renovated resident lounge, fitness center, on-site valet and outdoor terrace.


63 Wall Street

Building:

Aerial view of 63-67 Wall Street

Aerial view of 63-67 Wall Street

Built in 1928, 63 Wall Street was designed by architects Delano and Aldrich as the headquarters of the oldest and largest partnership bank in the country (Brown Brothers Harriman & Co.).  At 37-stories, the high-rise “wedding cake” apartment building has several setbacks and a cellar.

The Bruckner family purchased 63 Wall Street in 1994 and then converted the building from office to residential rental apartments in 2004.  63 Wall Street is comprised of 476 apartments, private outdoor space, retail, fitness center, resident lounge and a parking garage. 

 

67 Wall Street

Building:

67 Wall Street was built in 1921 as the headquarters for the Munson Shipping Company. As rich in architectural detail as in history, the building, with intricate metal work on the windows and terra cotta roofing, occupies the corner that once housed the offices of Alexander Hamilton.

After being purchased in 2004, 67 Wall Street was converted from office to residential under the Bruckner family’s ownership in three phases. 63 Wall Street is 25-stories and is comprised of 339 apartments, private outdoor space, retail, fitness center, and resident lounge.